2017 Predictions for the Live Video Revolution

2017 Predictions for the Live Video Revolution with Joel Comm and Marc Gawith

[TRANSCRIPT]
Marc Gawith:
Thanks for bearing with us as we had some technical difficulties.

Joel Comm:
That never happens.

Marc Gawith:
Right, that’s the beauty of live video. I’m here with Joel Comm, the one, the only Joel Comm with two Ms in Comm, everyone. We are here to chat a little bit about 2016 and live video, what we saw, our impressions, our takeaways from that, and then where we see live video being in 2017. I know, Joel, you and I have talked a little bit about this in the past offline, if you will, but definitely think now being the last month of the year, it’s a great time to talk about where we’re at right now in 2016, how we got to this point, and where we see 2017 taking us, taking this community. Basically, hopefully, I think we’re both on the same page that we think 2017 will be the year of live video.
Thank you so much for joining me today and working through all these technical issues. Thank you for repping the .LIVE shirt, by the way. Appreciate that, the .LIVE.

Joel Comm:
There it is.

Marc Gawith:
There it is.

Joel Comm:
The new one, this is the new shirt.

Marc Gawith:
It is the new shirt. It’s a little darker than the previous one, which I like myself. We’ve had some rave reviews on it.

Joel Comm:
I’m just sharing to the live video Marketing Mastermind and my page. If anybody else wants to share, then please do.

Marc Gawith:
Yes, definitely, please share, please jump in. Would love to get any questions, or feedback, or impressions that you have regarding the year 2016 and what you saw in live video.
Joel, why don’t we just, I guess, jump in and would love to get your take on live video 2016. We’ve seen a lot of things happen, I would definitely say probably more so than just about any other launch or movement, if you will. Traditional social media, we had the Twitters, and the Facebooks, and the Myspace, we had the three big ones, and then there’s a couple new ones that came along, but I don’t think anything really has compared to the iterations and the development that we’ve seen in the live video space really over the 12 months or 11 months really. Interested to get your thoughts. I think you more than anyone has played around with just about every platform that’s come our way, so I’d love to get your thoughts and your takeaways so far for 2016.

Joel Comm:
Yeah, Marc, clearly live video is the most significant development in social media since the invention of this device right here, the smartphone. It is the biggest move forward into making us more social. The fact that we’re able to do these face to face interviews now and instantly push them to social media whether it’s through Periscope Producer, or through Facebook Live or some of the other multi-channel options is proof that this is becoming a big deal.
From 2015 to 2016 we moved from pioneer to early adopter phase and we now have a lot of people that are doing live video, but the masses have still not arrived. We’ve got a few networks that are now using live video, we’ve got some big brands and some small ones that are using live video, but the masses are yet to arrive. The bell curve of technology adoption, it goes like this. You can see my invisible line here. We’re right about here right now. 2017 is going to take us to about here, and 2018 is when I believe we’re going to really start hitting mass adoption. We’re on the early part of the curve still. While Facebook is definitely a leader in the space, Periscope is still pretty big, and we have yet to see some of the larger players enter the live video space. That’s why I’m excited to talk about what I believe is coming to us next.

Marc Gawith:
Would you equate this to the land rush back in the 1800s when everyone’s moving west, the Oklahoma land rush, the whole idea of a sooner? Would you use that as the analogy for where we’re at in live video right now. We’re moving from the established, the more metropolitan, if you will, areas to more of the Wild West where we’ve got a lot of new players entering the space. We’ve got a lot of development happening. There’s a lot of people competing for your eyeballs, a lot of land competing for your loyalty. That’s the way that I see it. I’ve love to see if you …

Joel Comm:
I don’t disagree. It’s been interesting that as the power is shifting from traditional mainstream broadcasting to the citizens to you don’t have to be a big brand, you don’t have to be a major broadcast to do a live video, what you do have to do is create content that is compelling so that people watch, and not only do they watch but they come back for more, and not only do they come back for more but they tell their friends. That is really the essence of viral marketing is telling a story so compelling that others will want to tell it for you.
Of course this has the establishment, the mainstream establishment tied up in knots, speaking particularly about journalism with quotes because there’s all this talk of what’s real news and what’s fake news. The mainstream establishments are really tied up and in a tizzy because they’re losing their power, and the only way they can hold onto it is saying, “Don’t listen to anybody else because we are the official news sources. Look at us, we have the nice studios, and we wear suit and ties, and we have the polished sets. We are the voice of authority.” The people are beginning to discover that that isn’t necessarily the truth. Live video has given a voice not only to citizen journalists, to those that are opinion makers, but also to be able, if you’re talented in any respect whether your talent is sharing information, inspiring people, motivating them, singing, doing magic tricks, whatever that is, it’s leveled the playing field in a new way where it’s almost like American Idol. Anybody can audition and have their opportunity to get on and be seen. Now, guess what? Here’s your chance. Are you going to make it break it?
We build our tribes and our audiences. I subscribe to different people on Periscope. Some of them are entertaining, some of them are opinion makers, some of them are political, some of them are just goofy. I like to go and see what they’re doing with the platform. With me, it’s never one thing. One day I might be talking politics, another I’ll be talking live video, another I’ll be talking computer games. If you watched my Periscope today, you watched me shave. I am my brand, and the people who connect with me connect because of my brand. I think that that is the future of live video. People will connect with others that they know, like and trust.

Marc Gawith:
Yeah, I think you said something really powerful there, and something that we preach a lot here at our company is you are your brand. Promote your brand. You do you. Here at .LIVE, that’s what we’re all about. That’s what we’re all about talking about, we’re all about promoting yourself. Promote your brand. Don’t promote someone else’s brand. Don’t promote Facebook. You can use Facebook as the vehicle to broadcast your message and to go live and build a community, but use joel.liveย as the main call to action to get there. I really love that you mentioned that.
Obviously I know you and I are of the same opinion building your own brand is a powerful thing to do. I think live video only lends itself to doing that, allowing you to further promote yourself, promote your individual brand. It gives you the ability to reach people on a whole new level which I think is so great about this whole live video movement. Literally we’re in two different time zones, and we can literally just click a button, chat face to face and then have all of our friends and our community members chime in, tell you how good your freshly shaved face looks when you watch this real time. It’s truly an amazing movement.
For me, I think there’s a lot of still unknowns. At least the way I feel, the reason that brands, we haven’t seen them adopt it is they don’t know how to go live. They’re still getting in their own way. They’re basically trying to justify it. They’re trying to figure out, “Well, what do I say? What do I do? Who do I talk to?”

Joel Comm:
That’s great news for people like me, and Vincenzo Landino and Carlos Gill that as paid consultants we can show them how to do this. Often it begins with just bringing people back to understanding that people connect with real. It’s not about being polished. It’s about being real and authentic. We should’ve learned this lesson from YouTube creators. There’s some that have really polished videos, but there’s others that have hundreds of thousands or millions of followers just from vlogging, just from sitting in front of their webcam and sharing their thoughts. It’s because people are connecting with the content, the substance of it, not necessarily the style.

Marc Gawith:
Yeah, you’re absolutely right. Obviously we both know Bryan Kramer, his Human to Human. Never has that been, I think, more relevant and been this drum that we all beat than with live video. It gives you that human to human element, the ability to have that face to face meeting. Basically that’s what it is. You and I are essentially, we’re having a conversation. Anyone that wants to join in on our conversation can. I can see you, I can talk to you, I can pick up on your non-verbal cues, and all of a sudden we have a better conversation, we have a better experience because we have the ability to go live and talk to each other in that moment as opposed to…

Joel Comm:
I’m non-verbal cuing.

Marc Gawith:
I’m not picking up on what you’re saying on this one.

Joel Comm:
I non-verbal cued you. Those of you watching, please share. That’s all part of the live video MO is that when you’re watching, if you’re enjoying the content, we help spread the word by clicking the share button right there below the post regardless of which page you’re viewing it on. You could also share to Twitter and let people know that this is interesting. Of course if you do have a question or you want to comment on Facebook, I believe if you’re commenting on the actual .LIVE page, then the comments show up here in the BLIVE interface where we can put them up on the screen and share so everybody can see.
With that, Marc, should we get into the 2017 live video predictions?

Marc Gawith:
Definitely, yeah. Let’s talk about it. Maybe let’s start off with we’ve seen some platforms come and go over 2016. Do you have any predictions on ones that we are going to see dissipate and fizzle out, maybe get bought up or swallowed up by a larger one? Any predictions on ones that we might see not be here?

Joel Comm:
I want to give you my most dramatic predictions. I’ve written down three. Along the lines of your first question, let’s go with the existing site that’s going to get swallowed up, Twitter. Twitter is going to get bought in 2017. We saw a lot of talk about it in 2016. We heard that Disney was interested. We heard that Salesforce was interested. Who was the other big one? There was a third one that was in the news. I can’t remember at the moment. All of them said no. I think Twitter’s share price is at $18 right now. It’s going to fall more. Twitter’s leadership is horrible. I have no confidence in Jack Dorsey or their leadership team. They’ve got some serious issues going on with censorship, and they have serious issues going on with profitability. Neither one of these are good. The best thing that they have going for them in my mind is live video, which is through Periscope.
Of course the other thing they have going or them is that they are very enmeshed in pop culture really all over the world. Hashtags and @usernames are on TV shows and movies, on advertisements, on billboards, in magazines, and we’re used to it, so we get it. Unlike most failing businesses, Twitter has a very distinct advantage because they are so firmly ensconced in the mind share of the social media base. They have a huge problem retaining users. They’ve only got 317 million month only, 317 million monthly users, but they’ve signed up over a billion. Where are those people? Why aren’t they sticking where Facebook is at 1.6 billion members and over a billion active users each month? I believe
I believe the saving grace for Twitter is live video. That said, they need to get bought, and I think it’s going to happen when it gets around $10 a share, $10 to $12. I’ll be generous. I think investors are going to continue to lose confidence because they’re not seeing the monetization. I believe, here’s the bold prediction, Twitter will get bought by a media company, hopefully one that will be fair and a free speech advocate that won’t censor either side because we’re definitely seeing left leaning on it, and there are people on the other side of the spectrum that are getting banned when some really, really horrible people are using Twitter for incredibly racist things that they’re allowing to go on. There needs to be a fair and balanced approach to how they use Twitter.
I believe a media company that understands mass media, that understands video, and programming, and how to turn it into a content channel that is supported by a social media network that has discussions around the media that’s being published whether it’s live programming coming from the NFL or National Hockey League, or whether it is programming coming from you or me, quality programming that engages with people, I believe, is the saving grace of Twitter. I think that it’s time. They’re going to get bought. They’re not just going to go out of business. There’s too much market penetration. Somebody is going to sweep in and they’re going to rescue Twitter. Number one prediction is Twitter gets bought.

Marc Gawith:
You see this basically as a, I’m sure you probably read the article, but Casey Neistat’s Beme app that CNN just purchased.

Joel Comm:
Yeah, how did that happen?

Marc Gawith:
They purchased it to get Casey Neistat on their payroll basically. They’re buying his app to get him to be a contributor for them. That’s essentially the same path that you see Twitter going down, a company like …

Joel Comm:
He’s kind of been there anyway. We know he was a donor to the Clinton campaign, and he was making videos beforehand which offended a lot of people. He alienated a lot of people by going to his entertaining YouTube channel and telling people who to vote for, and trying to stir the pot. Yeah, they bought him long before they paid him.

Marc Gawith:
That’s fair, that’s fair. You said it’s a bold prediction. I definitely don’t disagree with you. I think it’s definitely bold to say that it’s going to happen in 2017, and definitely would not surprise me one bit if that ends up happening just with all the buzz that’s going around. I guess to come back, basically Twitter would go away but it would remain because, like you said, there’s no way someone could just shut it down. Someone would buy it and operate it.

Joel Comm:
It would be crazy to, not with that kind of reach. Why would you not? Somebody’s going to see the bargain when it hits a bargain basement price. That’s going to happen. Along those same lines, I believe Periscope will become known as Twitter Live. I think at some point they’re going to phase out the name Periscope. There’s no reason to call it Periscope. More people know the Twitter brand. Periscope videos are now streaming in the Twitter stream, and they’re trying to get people to go and download the Periscope app to watch them. That’s nonsense. Just integrate with the Twitter app, make it all part of the same thing. Twitter, why aren’t you listening? I don’t know what kind of deal they swung with Kayvon to keep the Periscope name or why they think this is smart, but it’s not. It’s time for full integration. Just call it Twitter Live and let’s move on.

Marc Gawith:
A la Facebook, what Facebook did, right?

Joel Comm:
Exactly.

Marc Gawith:
Facebook has come out and basically said, “We’re focusing on live. We’re giving preferential treatment to live.” Twitter should be doing the same thing. Essentially if the behemoth known as Facebook has put that much energy and effort into live video, it’s not like they’re out in left field. They don’t make a move without doing something that’s very calculated and profitable for them. We should all stand up and take notice what Facebook is doing not necessarily to follow in their footsteps, but let’s learn from the people that are blazing the path. There’s a reason that Facebook is here and Myspace isn’t. To continue on that path, maybe Twitter should reach out to Facebook and fin out how they can make this a little more profitable.

Joel Comm:
Well, I hope Facebook doesn’t buy them. Here’s the deal. We talked about new media becoming the new voice of the people. When you look at where people are going, it’s very divided in our country which side people are on. I’m going to do a whole Periscope in the near future about why Fox News became so successful and why the Drudge Report and sites like Breitbart are getting tens of millions of viewers. There’s a very specific reason that’s happening. I think one of these new media companies that is looking to move into expanding their media, Twitter’s the way they can do it. I could even see a collective of people who subscribe to one of these sites becoming the investors knowing that there’s going to be a new media channel that they can support, but that’s a whole other issue.

Marc Gawith:
No, that’s amazing.

Joel Comm:
That’s number one.

Marc Gawith:
You guys heard it here first from Mr. Joel Comm, Twitter will be acquired in 2017 when the share prices hit between $10 and $12. He didn’t want to put an exact price on it, so he did a $2 price range.

Joel Comm:
Yeah, who knows? I’m not a stock analyst. I just know that it’s not attractive enough yet to the suitors that were looking at it, but they’re watching. They are watching, and so we’ll see what happens.
Okay, should we do number two?

Marc Gawith:
All right, so number two. Yeah, what’s number two?

Joel Comm:
Number two is virtual reality and 360 video is going to move from pioneering to early adopter in 2017. It is the next phase. Of course with 360 video we’re talking about consumer grade versions of cameras like this, the ALLie Cam. This is a $499 camera with a camera on each side that picks up full 360. You’ve used one of these before. I’ve done videos demonstrating them before. Of course Facebook has the ability for you to upload 360 videos and then you can click around, and you can drag, and you can basically see anywhere.
What we’re looking for a experiences that put us in the center of the action. What we’re wanting in business is to be able to draw our clients into the experience, for example, realtors, travel bureaus, these types of things, really anything where you want to show people behind the scenes and provide an experience for them. Combine that with virtual reality … I have here the Oculus Rift. This is one of a few brands that are available now that allow you to put the headset on and have VR experiences as though you are there. This is the future of what’s coming our way. I believe by 2017, December, a year from now, Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzmas, all that good stuff … I should just say happy Ramahanukwanzmas so we cover all the bases. I believe that the kids that are on the frontlines of what’s cool in tech, this is what’s going to be on their gift list for 2017. They’re going to want an Oculus, they’re going to want an HTC Vive, they’re going to want a Microsoft HoloLens. Developers for these pieces of hardware are going to be spending more money on creating these VR and 360 degree experiences.
2018 is not the year of VR, but we’re going to see that steady uptick as we move from pioneer to early adopter. As the base of installed users, whether on a PC, a Mac, a PlayStation, an Xbox, as the base increases, that’s where the money is going to pour in. Now you’re going to see experiences on a pay-per-view. Right now we spend millions of dollars on fights that you can see on pay-per-view coming from Las Vegas. Well, imagine a major performing artist, I like to use Taylor Swift because she always sells out, she’ll sell out an arena of 20,000. Scalpers are scalping tickets at ridiculous prices. What if you could put on your Oculus or your Vive and with your stereo headset have a front row center seat to see Taylor Swift for $50? How many seats can they sell from that one camera for $50? A million of them.
Performers are going to have the opportunity to reach a global audience with one show going directly into people’s homes and having them experience that concert as though they are sitting front and center. They’ll be able to look to the left and see people, they’ll be able to look to the right, look behind them, and there is their performer whether it is a musician, or a comedian, or whether it’s a Broadway play, whether it is a political speech. We might be able to, whoever our president is at any time in the future, sit in the Oval Office with the president speaking directly to us and looking around as though we’re sitting in the Oval Office. These are the future of experiences, and they’re going to happen. 2017 is going to be the gift year for the early adopters of 360 and virtual reality.

Marc Gawith:
Yeah, that’s interesting. I know you and I have talked about this in the past, or I’ve heard you talk about it on a live broadcast before. I was just in London and I talked to the international content manager for Universal Music Group. We were talking about why is it that artists haven’t done this before? They’re missing out on a huge, massive, yuge to use the term of the season, opportunity. We’re talking millions if not billions of dollars. I have a nine month-old son. I can’t go see a concert. It takes a lot of money for me to do that. If I could buy a virtual ticket and basically be in the comfort of my own home and be able to check on my son when I need to but watch the concert, I’d even pay $150 for that. Then I can drink all of the booze out of my own fridge that I want to for not $20 a beer. The affordability level is much greater, but the accessibility, it’s huge.
One other question along those lines, you mentioned next Christmas will be the VR Christmas. We’ll dub it as the VR Christmas.

Joel Comm:
It’s not mainstream in 2017. We’re still going to be early adopter.

Marc Gawith:
Right.

Joel Comm:
I think 2018, way more likely to be the real breakthrough year of VR because realize when these come out, this Oculus Rift was $500 and I just paid $200 for the hand controllers that are coming out so I can swing swords and do that type of stuff. They’re not going to be that affordable yet, but by 2018 they will be.

Marc Gawith:
That was going to be my question. Do you see the manufacturers starting to drop prices and start to compete with each other, or do you still think it’s too early days for them to really have to do that in order to compete?

Joel Comm:
It is too early, but look at this. This is a brick phone. What you’re looking at is a brick phone. Remember the old cell phones that were huge? Now we carry these. This is the brick phone of virtual reality. These are going to get smaller as the technology improves, they’re going to get much smaller, they’re going to get lighter, the technology is going to be better, and they’re going to be cheaper.
Brian Fanzo in the house. Good to see you, Fanzo, always.

Marc Gawith:
Do you envision that at some point having something that’s almost like a spectacle size VR goggle where it’s basically like a pair of glasses essentially that you wear to where it’s not bulky looking, and not that that’s even that bulky. It’s basically big enough to put your phone in there to have that VR experience.

Joel Comm:
Yeah, well not in these.

Marc Gawith:
Right, yes.

Joel Comm:
You don’t put your phone in these, but in the cardboard headsets style you do. It’s interesting you mention Snapchat because that’s actually a perfect segue into prediction number three, my final prediction. Let me say this about that. I remember when I was growing up we had the tube television sets, these massive units, and then we had the big screens where you would open up the mirror so that the red, green, blue would reflect off onto the screen. Now we’ve got flat screens, these plasma screens and the like, the LEDs. They’re flat. Some of them are this thick. It’s amazing. Yes, we’re going to see something that is more like glasses.
That leads us to number three which are the Snapchat spectacles. Here’s the case, and … Oh, where are they?

Marc Gawith:
He’s already lost them?

Joel Comm:
They’re at the optometrist. Todd Bergin, a fan of mine who’s now becoming a friend, was kind enough to secure me a pair and I got to try them out. I like them. I think they’re cool. They allow you to record 10 seconds at a time and then it Bluetooths the videos to your phone, and then you pick them from you Snapchat memories and send whichever ones you want which you can embellish with stickers, and drawings, and text as part of your story. They’re very cool. I took them to my optometrist and they sent them off to the lab to see can these be fit with custom lenses because, as you might be aware, I wear glasses. I want to have lenses in them that I can see through so I can take them out. I expect to hear from them today or tomorrow, and I’m hoping that it’s affirmative that I can do it.
For $130 retail, this is one of the most brilliant marketing plans I’ve seen in years that they have these vending machines which are incredibly stylish, they’re yellow with the circle in the middle, and people are lining up for six, seven hours in the hopes of acquiring a pair of Snapchat Spectacles. I think I’m the first person in Denver, if not Colorado, to have a pair, and I’m hoping that this works.
Here’s the prediction. This is not about 10-second videos. My prediction is that this is completely about live video and that Snapchat … I’ve been saying this before they didn’t have a choice, but now they really have no choice. With Facebook Live, Twitter Live, Instagram Stories live, Snapchat has no choice but to go live and have all the functionality of placing stickers, and drawings, and text on their videos, and Spectacles are the gateway for them to dominate. I’m talking putting people on the streets in experiences everywhere with the click of a button live on Snapchat, first person, and I think that they really have an opportunity to go crazy with this. Now I’ve not heard anything, I have no inside contacts. This is my prediction. I think Snapchat Live is going to happen probably by spring of 2017 and then connection to Spectacles sometime in summer or fall. The world, once again, will change.

Marc Gawith:
The way that I see Spectacles is basically, like you said, a very, very amazing marketing ploy, but it’s their first foray into this live video, get people to start adopting it, get people used to the idea of wearing glasses that are fitted with a camera. I think from the things that I’ve read, it sounds like the camera is not as high quality as your iPhone camera, so it sounds like literally it’s V1. It’s the first iteration. I’m sure they will continue to upgrade it and make it even better. How cool is that going to be if this prediction holds true and all I have to do … I can ultimately see Warby Parker designing their own spectacles that are very much a high fashion with the built-in camera.

Joel Comm:
Absolutely.

Marc Gawith:
It looks like you’re wearing a pair of glasses, and you can simply capture a live moment at any point just by simply activating the video camera built intoย your glasses.

Joel Comm:
Absolutely. They’re not a accessory company. They are a camera company. Snap Inc. is now a photography camera company that happens to manufacture an app that is used on their cameras, who manufactures glasses that connect to these cameras. My John Varvatos frames with licensing from Snapchat could easily be fitted with a camera that goes right here. I think this is their first iteration. To me, the clearest signal is not snapping 10-second videos. It is that now I’m more certain than ever that Snapchat is going to be doing live video.
I think back to earlier in this year when I was saying this and everybody was like, “No, that’s not going to happen. Snapchat purists won’t go for that. Why would they get into there?” They don’t have a choice now. Instagram Stories is catching on and live is coming. I don’t know if it’s rolled out to you yet. I know they announced a week ago that over the next two weeks this would be showing up. I still do not have live as an option on mine. I don’t know that I’ve seen anybody that does yet.

Marc Gawith:
For Instagram, you’re saying?

Joel Comm:
For Instagram Stores, yeah.

Marc Gawith:
Yeah, I haven’t seen it on mine. I’m not a huge Instagram user. I only use it to really share photos of my son with people in different locations. I definitely think you’re absolutely correct. I’m surprised, frankly, that Snap Inc. hasn’t done this earlier. I’m surprised it actually took them this long. Maybe they’ve been thinking about it internally and they’re just waiting for the right time to make their move or having something that differentiates them from the Facebooks and the Periscopes. Having a pair of glasses that allow you to shoot live video definitely is different than anything else that’s out there.

Joel Comm:
Yeah, that’s totally it. If I was them and seeing how they are marketing rolling things out, first of all, unless there’s a manufacturing or distribution issue with the spectacles, by December 10 to 15 they’ve got to stop with the vending machines and just make them available for order to everybody because it will be the hottest Christmas gift.

Marc Gawith:
You said they’re $130?

Joel Comm:
I think they’re 130 bucks, yeah, and they come in black, teal, and I think a pink or orange or something like that. There’s another neony color. I think that they should be selling them directly from their site. They should be selling them on Amazon. They should be everywhere and let the world just get inundated so everybody is equipped with these glasses and then once you have your installed user base … Because what it’s going to do is Snapchat Spectacles are going to bring people to Snapchat that have never used Snapchat, that don’t know what Snapchat is. They’re going to be like, “I don’t know what these are, but these are cool. I can shoot video with them.” Get the installed user base.
Look, I’m not a coder. I don’t know how difficult this is going to be, but you’ve already got the camera that is connected via Bluetooth to your phone. You’ve already got the button that signals let’s record. Once you’re on bandwidth on your phone, how much of a step is it to be able to tap and hold to go live? I think that they’re a lot closer to this, being able to do it, than they are to actually doing it because they want the installed user base there first.

Marc Gawith:
Yeah, yeah, I think you’re absolutely right. I think before we actually went live you were talking about bandwidth. We haven’t even reached the pinnacle, if you will, of bandwidth that’s available to us. I think you were telling me about something in China or someplace where basically you can download a full length movie in less than a second or something like that. If something like that arrives here in the States, we have access to that quick, the networks are that fast and basically bandwidth is no longer an option, you don’t even need Wi-Fi anymore.

Joel Comm:
It’s 5G, it’s that next step up in bandwidth. Right, we’re going to look at today’s bandwidth the way we joke about dial-up now, where they’re going to joke about the bandwidth that we currently have as the way we joke about having a dial-up modem because you will get whatever you want on demand. Of course the bandwidth has to increase so that we can get to streaming 360 video, which is coming to Facebook. It might happen before the year is out, live streaming, because right now we can live stream from ALLie Cam or from our, I think it’s a Nikon, there’s a few 360 cameras. We can stream to YouTube live in 360. It’s coming to Facebook soon. We’re talking a matter of months if not weeks. We know that two-person just like we’re doing here, two-person broadcasting should have been on Facebook already. They screwed it up in their first iteration, and it’s going to happen. We’ve been waiting for Periscope to figure out the technology limitations that are keeping them from doing two-person broadcasting, but that’s going to happen as well in 2017. It has to. They have to in order to compete.

Marc Gawith:
I think that is one of the biggest things that’s holding Periscope back is the only way to broadcast is one to many. You don’t have the ability to do these sort of interactions. There’s not the ability to use a platform like a BlueJeans. There’s Periscope Producer now. You have the ability to do that now.

Joel Comm:
Yeah, you can.

Marc Gawith:
Right, but historically, before Periscope Producer was available, the only opportunity was me going live and having people be able to interact with me via text. There wasn’t the ability to have someone come on as a guest and have this dialogue like we’re having right now. From that perspective, I feel like they’re lagging behind in their iterations and rolling out new product features and feature sets.
That’s one thing I think that Facebook has done a really good job of allowing companies like a BLIVE to integrate directly into Facebook and allow you to do these things in the meantime until Facebook gets their integrated two-person broadcast done or multi-person broadcast. From that perspective, I think that’s one thing that’s really held Periscope or Twitter Live, or however we want to refer to them, back from really continuing to be the go to live video platform like it originally started as. It basically killed Meerkat, right? Periscope killed the Meerkat star, to use an old song lyric.
It is very interesting. I think there’s a lot of amazing things that are about to happen. I don’t know about you but I’m super excited to be sitting where I’m sitting to be able to have a front row seat to be a part of all of this. It really is an amazing market niche that we’re in. I don’t know that I’ve seen anything like this as far as development and the race to be first, the race to have the best product. The sheer number of companies that are getting involved in this that want a piece of the pie, it makes me feel good about where we as a company sit because we’re successful no matter which one of those platforms is successful.

Joel Comm:
Right. Let me throw this at you along those lines as I know we’ve got to close out here in a moment. Let me throw in a prediction number four because you said there’s a lot of big players, and some of them have not yet thrown their hats in the ring. Again, there’s no inside information here. Number one, the most likely to get involved would LinkedIn. They’re now owned by Microsoft, and Microsoft also owns Skype, a lot of the foundational technology that’s needed to create a live business video channel that wouldn’t be just people being goofy but would be content related to business. I think LinkedIn has an opportunity. I’m surprised they’re not doing it yet.
Two other brands that have a video infrastructure and probably would not be a huge leap for them to take the switch to allow consumer generated content, Amazon anybody? How about Netflix? Hmm, wouldn’t surprise me to see either or both of these enter in because it’s about eyeballs. It’s about minutes watched, used. They’re competing for that. Any time one of these biggies that is creating content and depending upon minutes viewed is not entering into the space, then they could be giving up those eyeballs to a competitor. Let’s watch for the rumblings for that to happen in 2017 as well.

Marc Gawith:
What about this? I could see the likes of an Apple or a Netflix or something like that where they basically integrate Facebook Live into smart TVs.

Joel Comm:
That’s coming for sure, no doubt.

Marc Gawith:
Yeah, that would be the way that I see the first iteration of that happening with a Netflix or something like that. You have the Facebook app built in, and all of a sudden I can watch this broadcast from my smart TV at home as opposed to my computer because it has the internet connection. If my TV has a built-in camera, then all of a sudden I’m able to participate in this broadcast.
I think it all boils down, again, I hear a lot of people say this, it seems to be a buzzword, but it’s accessibility. Everything is going to be so accessible to us, and I think that’s what scares, back to one of your original points, I think that’s what scares media companies is no longer do we have to depend upon the traditional news cycles, the traditional ways that we’re so used to consuming content. Now it’s all on demand. On demand has truly never meant on demand until right now. We think about on demand as, “Oh, I can go watch a show whenever I want on demand on my cable box,” but now it’s like, “Oh, no, I can just literally watch something as it’s happening in the moment on my phone if I’m not sitting in front of my TV.”
Cars are being fitted with 4G LTE Wi-Fi. I was just in a Yukon that I rented in Phoenix and it had built-in Wi-Fi, a Wi-Fi hotspot built in. There is no reason that we shouldn’t have access to everything at the moment that it happens now.

Joel Comm:
I want it now.

Marc Gawith:
Exactly. Was that Veruca Salt on Charlie and the Chocolate Factory when she sang that song?

Joel Comm:
I want the goose that lays gold eggs for Easter. Yeah, we do. We are a microwave society. We’re used to getting what we want when we want it, and live video just feeds into that. Of course that means there’s going to be a lot of crappy content out there, but that will go away when the people creating that content don’t build an audience. Those that persist by bringing value are the ones that are going to build the audiences. Myself and my peers, Brian Fanzo, Vincenzo Landino both popped in here, are seeing that. They see their numbers increase with every broadcast we do that’s trending up because we’re building an audience based on people liking, knowing and trusting us, or at the very least being entertained.

Marc Gawith:
Yeah, ultimately I think entertainment goes a long way. I think you’re absolutely right, at least in the stage we’re at right now with live video, there has to be that know, like and trust factor. Ultimately that’s the only reason that I’m where I’m at right now is because I’ve built relationships with the likes of Joel Comm, and Brian Fanzo, and Ryan Bell, and Vincenzo Landino, all of the early adopters, the pioneers, if you will, in this space that have been doing this for a long time, not that my name is synonymous with yours by any stretch of the imagination.

Comments 25

  1. Vincenzo M Landino

    Lots going to be happening in 2017, no doubt

    1 December, 2016
  2. Vincenzo M Landino

    Interested in what Joel will say here

    1 December, 2016
  3. Claudia Santiago

    Hey guys! ๐Ÿ™Œ

    1 December, 2016
  4. Chris Strub

    Look at that shaved Joel Comm mug lol

    1 December, 2016
  5. Marc-Antoine Brassard

    Hey

    1 December, 2016
  6. Claudia Santiago

    Lol! Hey Chris ๐Ÿ™Œ

    1 December, 2016
  7. Chris Strub

    ROTFL you always look great MG ๐Ÿ˜Š

    1 December, 2016
  8. Chris Strub

    Hey Claudia ๐Ÿ˜Š

    1 December, 2016
  9. Leilani M-Tan

    Looking good Joel

    1 December, 2016
  10. Robert Zebrowski

    But does somebody really want to watch you shave? What’s next? : )

    1 December, 2016
  11. Vincenzo M Landino

    Love it, Joel Comm! “left leaning” ๐Ÿ˜‰

    1 December, 2016
  12. Vincenzo M Landino

    Too much censorship. Look at ATT/Turner merger. ATT will have access to Hulu, HBO and more. Net neutrality conversation we were having over at Aftermarq Afterthoughts earlier. Thanks for jumping in Joel.

    1 December, 2016
  13. Vincenzo M Landino

    Casey got bought because CNN is left leaning and Casey made that video about who he voted for

    1 December, 2016
  14. Vincenzo M Landino

    BINGO Joel Comm

    1 December, 2016
  15. Vincenzo M Landino

    Isn’t that a scary premise though? CNN literally just bought 5 million subscribers on YouTube

    1 December, 2016
  16. Vincenzo M Landino

    Yup! It needs to be Twitter Live a long time ago

    1 December, 2016
  17. Brian Fanzo

    Look at these two young Millennial looking guys!

    1 December, 2016
  18. Brian Fanzo

    I just want to carry Joel’s luggage into the future!

    1 December, 2016
  19. Peter Nez

    He does look younger clean shaven ๐Ÿ˜

    1 December, 2016
  20. Robert A. Velarde

    It’s an exciting time to be a participant of new innovation! ๐Ÿ˜€

    1 December, 2016
  21. Brian Fanzo

    Interesting prediction Joel…. Hadn’t thought of that yet

    1 December, 2016
  22. Sabrina Cadini

    Brian LOL

    1 December, 2016
  23. Theresa Byrne

    Well, I feel smarter having watched this, thanks!

    1 December, 2016
  24. Saz Wilson

    hi ๐Ÿ™‚

    1 December, 2016
  25. Vincenzo M Landino

    Back in June, I was talking about some similar stuff with Twitter/Periscope. Think they’ll finally listen?

    http://vincenzolandino.com/twitter-live-video/

    1 December, 2016