2016 Live Video Recap and 2017 Predictions

2016 Recap and 2017 Predictions for Live Video featuring Ross Brand!

[TRANSCRIPT]
Marc Gawith:
Hello everyone, we are here live with Ross Brand. I am Marc Gawith of Rightside and the Be.Live community page. We are here talking about 2016 live video, talking about where we see 2017 headed. Wanted to bring on our friend Mr. Ross Brand, host of Live Stream Universe. Get his takes on what happened in 2016, where he sees 2017 leading us. Welcome, Ross. Thanks for being on the show today.

Ross Brand:
Thanks for having me Marc, and thanks for all you do to support live streaming. I love the new Be.Live website and it’s great to be on with you again.

Marc Gawith:
Absolutely, it’s been a little while since we’ve been able to connect over camera. I was actually just thinking about the last time we had a chance to connect. I think it was actually in person in July, actually, which is kind of crazy to think that it’s been that long ago. I might be thinking about it a little bit incorrectly.

Ross Brand:
The iSugar event, right?

Marc Gawith:
Exactly.

Ross Brand:
That was in New York City. We did chat there in the press release, when you announced live.

Marc Gawith:
That’s right.

Ross Brand:
That was probably the last time we chatted on video, right?

Marc Gawith:
Yes, it sure is. That just goes to show you, that was what? End of October? Here it is close to 2 months later and then everything moves so fast with us. There’s so much happening. So many good things happening, so much innovation which I am super excited about. I know you probably are as well.

Ross Brand:
Definitely.

Marc Gawith:
It gives you a lot of content for your show. Before we get into the recap of 2016 and looking ahead to 2017, why don’t you just go ahead and introduce yourself for those joining us from our Facebook page maybe that aren’t 100% familiar with you; what you do and the Live Stream Universe updates.

Ross Brand:
Sure, I’m Ross Brand. I’m from livestreamuniverse.com as Marc mentioned. I have a background in radio, then I left radio. I was on air for about 10 years, left radio. Went into HR and did some other things and about a year ago I discovered a platform called Blab. We try not to mention the B word too often, but I discovered Blab. Fell in love with this whole genre again and since then I’ve been doing what I can to highlight people who I think just do great stuff on live platforms like now like Facebook Live, Periscope, and the different live streaming platforms.
I started doing a show about a year ago and I do a show every Monday night called Live Stream Stars. It’s 7 PM Eastern, and it’s on The Live Stream Universe Facebook page. I also do 3 monthly shows; Ask the Expert, Live Stream News, and Live Stream Sports. Since June or July I’ve been doing a daily live stream update. Every day I talk about what shows are coming up that day and try to incorporate a little bit of video from live streamers, whether it’s a clip from a show or something that I asked somebody to send me talking about what’s going on in live video. Get their thoughts on a new development or something in the news, or what have you. You can find those again on the Facebook page Live Stream Universe. It’s facebook.com/livestreamuniverse. Also on our website, as well.

Marc Gawith:
Once again Ross, thank you so much for being on the show today. If you guys have not checked out Live Stream Universe and seen any of the recaps and shows that Ross does, definitely check him out. He’s great at what he does, has a great recap and has some amazing guests on his show. I’m just hoping to be on there one day, hopefully I’m good enough to be on there one day.

Ross Brand:
That’s definitely going to happen, and I can’t wait to have you on in February. That’s going to be a fun show.

Marc Gawith:
That’s right, that’s right. I guess let’s go ahead and get into it. There’s a lot of stuff that happened in 2016 in live video from some platforms going away, new platforms coming on board, these new platforms like Be Live, a TV which we’re using today to broadcast to Facebook Live and do this face to face interview. Being that Facebook hasn’t rolled that out yet for their native platform, you know just love to get your thoughts on what you saw as the biggest thing that happened in 2016 and maybe what surprised you the most regarding 2016.

Ross Brand:
Imagine if we were having this conversation a year ago, right? We’d probably be having it on Blab. After we talked a lot about what was going on with Blab, we’d probably mention how great it was that Meerkat got this all started, right? Then Periscope came into the game, and whatever. Now, 2 of those 3 platforms are gone and Periscope, while it still has a strong community, you notice it’s starting to pivot a little bit, right? It’s got Periscope Producer, so it’s starting to allow more professional style broadcasts, you can have multiple on as long as you know how to use an encoder like Wire Cast or OBS or Vmix or one of those kinds of software.
The other thing that Periscope is doing is it’s really trying to find people who are established broadcasters on other platforms with big followings and elevate them more and be able to monetize off of what they’re doing. What started out as sort of a fun conversation, mobile one to many, and all that is now you’re seeing the production quality on all levels. Whether it’s the talk show interview format or whether it’s the one to many, starting to improve. At the same time, you’re seeing really you’re starting to see bleeding into the news and all different kinds of areas, people coming on live from their cell phones. You don’t need a news team to spend a half an hour getting out there with a cameraman and you know, a reporter and all that. You have somebody who is actually there while the event is happening and getting video. That video can be the video that leads the nightly news or even a news channel goes to live.
The spread of live streaming and the quality has improved. I’d say there’s a good amount of people who’ve dropped off along the way. Those who have stuck with it, you see them getting better. I know Vencenzo’s watching and you see the production level for his shows continue to rise from compared to what he was doing on Blab to now is very, very professional looking. Lori Petrucci, she’s doing a show every single day that’s highly professional. You’re starting to see that this type of broadcast and the bar is raising for the average live streamer because of what leaders like Vencenzo and Lori are doing.
It’s going to be very interesting to see as we move forward we’re starting to see with the live fronts and things like that, a little bit of a merger where TV and live streaming are starting to come together a little bit. I think you’re going to see things bleed over from one to the other. Maybe one day in 2020, 2025 you’ll be watching something on Facebook and you’ll have no idea whether somebody’s broadcasting it from their home or they’re coming from NBC, CBS, ABC, FOX, CNN, wherever, right? You could even see that with the election coverage that some people were doing their own election coverage.

Marc Gawith:
You’ve got a good point.

Ross Brand:
When I saw that in my news feed, and I didn’t necessarily listen to the content, right? Just seeing it in my news feed, I stepped back for a minute. I said, “This looks almost like what I’m seeing on the news channels.” We’re not that far from it. Yes, of course you can do more with a multimillion dollar studios and production teams and all that. It’s getting closer. Even with a platform like B. Live. B.Live.TV. There’s the B.Live website, which keeps people up to date on what’s going on with live streaming, right? Shares tips and information and blog posts and then there’s this platform that we’re using right now where you’re able to highlight comments and share them on the screen. You’re able to put lower thirds on and things like that.
This platform itself that we’re using is a step forward for live streaming when you think about compared to Blab. It changes the way that you can view things and I think that’s very important on a platform like Facebook Live because things come so quickly, right? You have so many distractions and people start watching these videos with their sound off, so the ability to have some graphics and some movement and change shots and have multiple people on camera and things like that is a big plus in order to get that attention and keep people interested again, amongst all the distractions.

Marc Gawith:
That’s interesting, I think 2016 definitely saw a lot of innovation and I don’t necessarily think it was even a primary focus for a lot of these companies, right? It was sort of like innovation by necessity. It wasn’t something, at least to me personally, I don’t see with the exception of Facebook, any company really going out to really innovate and make something that was super killer. They just saw a need for something and they sort of plugged that hole, ala B. Live TV and this platform that we’re using right now. Facebook made mention that they would allow the 2 person broadcast, the face to face interview style like we’re doing here.

Ross Brand:
Right.

Marc Gawith:
I don’t know exactly when they announced that, I can’t remember. It was several months ago and here we are almost the end of 2016 and we still have not seen that. I’m sure the folks at BeLive basically said, “Hey, how awesome would it be because Facebook allows you to connect to their API and broadcast live with these different platforms, let’s create this now.” I think that’s what was so impactful to me about 2016. It was just seeing all of these different players come to the table and sort of give you a solution that you could use for another, an existing platform, but make it a little bit more professionally done. Definitely think 2016 was a good start to the live video and where we’re headed, but it’s super excited for 2017 for sure.

Ross Brand:
Absolutely.

Marc Gawith:
I know I just did an interview with Joel last week. Had some pretty amazing predictions that I’d like to just recap real quick and then definitely want to get your thoughts. Essentially, he gave me 3 predictions. Number 1 was that Twitter is going to get acquired in 2017. He went as far to say it will be when their stock price hits between 10 and 12 dollars. Definitely kind of gave us a window of time. Didn’t give us a calendar date to say “On this date it will happen.” Which I thought was very interesting. The 2nd one being VR and 360 video will be a very big part of 2017. He said we would basically move from the pioneer to the early adopter phase with VR and 360 and then finally, SnapChat will get involved with live video. Keeping those things in mind, would love to …

Ross Brand:
I think the Twitter thing’s fascinating, I think what he’s saying about Twitter could be right on. My wheelhouse isn’t SnapChat and VR, so I can’t really comment on that but the Twitter thing is genius. Joel knows Twitter, he’s written multiple, multiple books on Twitter and everything. I think that’s a very possible thing because it has potential in the right hands and when somebody sees it get low enough to acquire they may jump on it and re-energize it through video and some other things. It has Periscope video right now on Twitter and you can also, what I think is really underutilized and frankly, if I had 25 or 26 hours to the day I would probably use it more.
That’s just the ability to record video messages. It’s been around now for a couple of years I think, or at least for a year and a half or so. It’s a great way to respond to people in a tweet that comes across as more personal and everything. People just haven’t really gotten on that with a few exceptions. I see that being something that really could bring video to the forefront, besides the live videos from Periscope, right? I do love on Twitter now that you can watch the NFL, you can watch news, you can do all that and it’s in nice quality if you’re watching on a computer screen or a mobile phone. There’s value in Twitter. If the price drops low enough I really think that’s a really insightful prediction on Joel’s part that it’s very possible if the price drops low enough, some big media company is going to say “There’s an opportunity here, let’s get in.”

Marc Gawith:
I definitely think there is value in Twitter and I definitely don’t want to necessarily use all of our time today to discuss the previous predictions but I definitely see a lot of value there. It was my first introduction to social media, I used Twitter even before. Well, I take that back. We’re still considering MySpace to be a social media platform, I guess that was my first foray into social media.

Ross Brand:
I miss that one.

Marc Gawith:
Twitter is generally where I got started. Super excited, you know, to see what happens with that, who ends up acquiring them and what comes from that. Definitely interested to get your predictions. Do you have maybe 3 predictions regardless how big or small they are, definitely would love to hear your predictions for 2017 where you see this whole movement headed.

Ross Brand:
One is something that I discussed earlier a little bit and that is I see the continued professionalization of live streams where the production quality grows and people are able to do that more easily than they have in the past. Yes, you can get OBS, Wire Cast, Vmix, X Split, those type of encoders, right? You can produce yourself. You’re starting to see with platforms like BeLive.TV and others I’m sure will come along. Blue Jeans has increased the quality but not necessarily the production side of it. BeLive.TV brings some production elements and eventually you’re going to get to the point where the average person can start to do a fairly professionalized looking broadcast or at least bring those elements in more. Whether that will be in the middle of 2017, wow, where are we now? Or the end of 2017, it could be tomorrow, I don’t know. I see that coming, right? Where live streaming and those that do the interview talk show format will start to professionalize in that way.
I also see at the same time, TV moving towards bringing some of the interactivity into it that live streaming has. That’s really what makes this unique and special right? Is that we have a chat and that you have people contributing great ideas to the conversation and you have a community gathering together around these platforms. The way TV is used up to this point has been very contrived. “We’re going to read the 5 best tweets from the last week.” That’s not exactly how Twitter works, right? It’s an ongoing conversation. It’s nice that somebody tweeted something funny on Monday but that really isn’t using Twitter the way to make it interactive.
You’re having a debate and you’re going to go after some pre-selected question on Facebook that could have been asked by any other member of the town hall in person. Because Facebook is a partner in the debate, we’re going to go out and get the same question on Facebook. Again, it’s not spontaneously integrating something from the chat that enhances the broadcast in a different way than what is being done amongst the participants that are in person or on camera or what have you. I see that eventually, TV is going to have to say “Our audience wants to be interactive. They have multiple screens going. They’re on their phones, they’re watching in different platforms. We need to make them feel included, we need to talk to them. We need to bring them into the conversation. We need to share their comments.”
You can run, say, on a sporting event underneath ESPN will run 100 times “Sports Center coming up at the end of the game.” 17 times about the same free agent just signed a contract, “More details on Sports Center.” What if they put in what Marc Gawith thinks or what Vincenzo Landino thinks or what Joel Comm thinks? If they tweet something, and there’s no doubt that they could have an input on something or a view on something happening in a game that the analysts didn’t see, or the play by play announcer missed. That could be worth integrating. That would improve a sports broadcast and the same thing could be done for news, for talk. I think what Mario Armstrong is going to be doing with the Never Settle show, I think that’s a big. Obviously he’s got some production behind him with Al Roker and that production company and everything.
I think for those that are going to get supported and have the money to do something like that that’s the perfect marriage of traditional TV and live streaming. You’ve got a show with in person guests and a studio and an in person audience and at the same time you’re taking questions and integrating comments from Twitter and from the Facebook Live chat and, it’s going out to Facebook Live. That’s kind of what I see as a model going forward. Not that that’s for everybody, right? There’s another side of this, I’ll make this prediction too and I stole it completely right, but I stole it from the best. Tim McDonald was on my show on Monday night and he started live streaming back before we called it live streaming. Back with My Community Manager, Huff Post Live and all that stuff. He talked about the ability to have these conversations on mobile.
Now, pretty much the interview talk show conversation platforms, we tend to go live on from desktop or laptop and if we do go live on from mobile the experience isn’t that great for people watching. With the improved mobile connectivity and higher 5G or wherever we’re going with cell connections and everything, I think it’s eventually going to open up the opportunity for people to do shows like this or at least have public conversations like this from their mobile phones. I’m sure some type of stabilizing, there will be some sort of stabilizing mechanism, maybe built into the platform so you don’t have some of that shakiness that goes on with mobile and things like that. Technology’s going to make all sorts of things possible we haven’t thought of. People are already doing it but you’ll see more of it, people doing multiple camera broadcasts all with iPhones and iPads and things like that. You’re going to see both going towards TV but also things that are unique now because of mobile connectivity. Those will be 2 major things that I’m looking at for next year.

Marc Gawith:
Kind of going back to your prediction or talking about how we get more professionally produced live streams, 2017 being the year where we see more of that. Do you see one platform winning out over another in this kind of race? Do you think that there’s a current platform that is going to take over or is there one maybe that we haven’t even heard of? A new one comes to the table. Would love to get your thoughts. You mentioned Blue Jeans about the quality of the video, if you will, but not necessarily improving the production quality. Would love to just get your thoughts. I know you’ve used Wire Cast and Fire Talk and a couple of those others. From your experience, is there one that you think wins out over the others?

Ross Brand:
Right now you’re seeing that the game is being played on Facebook Live largely, right? That’s why BeLive TV is focused on Facebook Live, that’s why Blue Jeans is focused on Facebook Live. That’s probably why we’re having this conversation now on Facebook Live. If that’s where your community is, that’s where your friends and family are. It’s also where you probably have your Facebook groups and your Facebook page and where people are gathering to see content that they like and they’re getting notified partly because Facebook is pushing anything that you do live to everybody that’s connected to you. Even so, you’re getting notified because what you like and what you watch and all that kind of stuff will also push things higher in the algorithm even if they were to downgrade the priority on video. There’s a built in community here and it’s where most of us connect and communicate.
Periscope, I just think that for Periscope to get to the next level it has to be even more integrated into Twitter. You just go live from Twitter, you forget about going to Periscope. I’m on Twitter, we’re tweeting, you and I are going back and forth about what’s going to happen in 2017. All of the sudden you say, “Wow, this is a great conversation. This would make a good show or I bet a lot of people would like to get involved.” You hit the go live button there and you do it on Twitter where you’re already having conversations. You just finished up a Twitter chat and you got 10 people want to continue the conversation. I know that it isn’t a huge stretch to open up. It isn’t a huge stretch to open up your Periscope app on your phone, but it feels that way. It feels like “Now we all have to move over to Periscope.” If you could just go live and say “This is a nice discussion, but it’s better to actually see each other and talk to each other than try and do it through 140 characters.”
That’s, I think, a big opportunity for Twitter. I think right now if the average person said, “Where should I do my show?” I would say on Facebook Live. How you get there is up to what you’re comfortable with. You mentioned Wire Cast, I use Wire Cast for all my updates. Funny that it’s a live video production software platform or encoder that I actually use for something that I record because it allows me to switch shots quickly and do a bunch of different things as I’m recording at the same time. For live right now, I’ve been using Blue Jeans. I think BeLive TV is great, I think for those people that produce their own broadcast with OBS or Wire Cast, that’s great.
I think it doesn’t matter how you do it, you got to get to Facebook unless you either have a built in audience on Periscope or a good reason to get the Periscope. Having said all that, if you can go to both and you have the ability and you can pay attention to the audience on both and you can handle the comments on both, by all means, go to both. I just haven’t had the bandwidth to start playing around with Periscope Producer but I can’t wait to get on Periscope and put one of my shows on Periscope or just do something just for the Periscope audience and see who I meet and connect with that isn’t in my network already.
Facebook’s like your inner circle and Periscope and Twitter, you could reach anybody, right? It’s a low barrier to entry to connect with people. I’m not saying there’s no value in being on Periscope at all, I think there’s a lot of value. For some people depending on where their community is, it’s the right place to be and what kind of broadcasts they do. Random person came along and said “Where should I go?” I would say “Think about Facebook Live first.” Obviously, from what again you can see with BeLive TV and Blue Jeans and others, that’s mile time that’s where people who are trying to monetize from a 3rd party place are putting their dollars behind their audience or their users wanting to be on Facebook Live.

Marc Gawith:
I think you bring up a really good point as far as the place to get started, right? Facebook has come out and just said, “Hey, we’re putting an emphasis on live video. If you are interested in building your audience or getting more people to see your live video, definitely Facebook Live is the place to get started and get that exposure.” You probably can build up an audience a lot faster on Facebook Live than you would be able to do on the likes of a Periscope. I think there right now is a lot of noise on Periscope. There’s not a lot of discoverability.
I think they’re trying to fix that, specifically they’re trying to address that right now. We’ll definitely see where it goes. You know, you mentioned something very interesting in your answer there about broadcasting to multiple platforms. What are your thoughts on using a platform like Switchboard Live that allows you to take 1 video feed and push it out simultaneously to Periscope and Facebook Live and YouTube and Twitch and You Stream and all of these other platforms. You’re able to basically just do 1 broadcast but have everyone, regardless of what platform they prefer, be able to watch that stream. I’d love to get your thoughts on something like that.

Ross Brand:
I think there’s real value to that and you can do the same thing from a desk top with there’s sort of re-streaming services. There’s actually one called re-stream that I think is free for if you go to a few platforms only. You send them your stream basically and then they send it everywhere else. The value of doing something like that is you’re not looking this way and going, “Okay now I’m going to talk to my Facebook Live audience and ignore my Periscope audience and now I’m going to talk to my Periscope audience and I’ll be back to you my Facebook Live audience in a half an hour, but let me see the comments here on Twitter. If you’re commenting on Facebook Live right now you’re wasting your time because I’m only paying attention to Periscope.”

Marc Gawith:
Right.

Ross Brand:
There’s a value and there’s also value in having consistency. Not only are you looking all those people in the eye through the camera when you’re talking, but you’re keeping the same quality product through all. There are times that I think it’s kind of cool when people have multiple cameras going and each one’s a different platform and stuff. There’s definitely a value in being able to be consistent across platforms and to not have to worry about all the different platforms and audiences. You still have the chat issue. If you go to a lot of different platforms, what do you do? Do you ignore the chat on some? Do you say if you want to chat, come to Facebook? If you’re watching on the other platforms we love you but we can’t pay attention to them all. Do you have somebody moderate for you?
I know there’s some people who host their own chat and they say “Everybody, we love it that you watch on these different platforms but we’re going to do the chat on our own website.” That’s a way you can get somebody to your website, perhaps. There’s no easy answer. I know Lori, if she’s still watching, I know she has hers set up. It’s amazing. She has hers set up so that she’s on 4 different accounts but you can never tell which account she’s looking at. If you can do that, that’s amazing to follow or you have multiple phones or multiple computer screens or whatever. You were talking to Aaron from Arkon yesterday, maybe they’ve got some sort of mount that can get all your stuff around the outside of a computer screen or something so you can see all these chats. You have a couple iPad’s going or something.
If you can engage those chats, absolutely. Absolutely go to as many places as you can. I do that, I made a podcast version of my updates that I do daily so that people can get the audio version. Of course, you’re going to go to iTunes and you’re going to go to Google Play, but I put it on Stitch or I put it on Tune In Radio. I think I might have put it on at somewhere else, I didn’t even realize I was accepted at Stitch until it was retweeted by somebody from there. You get the idea, you put it where people are and you let them find it and enjoy it on the platform where they’re at. If you can do that and it works for your show then yeah, that’s great.
Let me give you one more quick prediction. Prediction number 3 if I can. This is, maybe it’s a kind of an obvious thing but I think you’re going to see more diversity of programs. When Blab was in it’s heyday, that couple of weeks in October or November of 2015. When Blab was in it’s heyday, most shows geared around marketing and solopreneurs, things you can use for business. There were a few more entertaining shows and things like that. Now you’re starting to see shows about all different kinds of things. You have somebody like Lesley Nance who’s teaching people how to stay free from cancer and how to use real food in their kitchen. Amazing stuff that’s doing, going to Periscope and Facebook Live. You have Jenn Nelson doing a wine antics, doing live streams about wine. I don’t think there’s too many people in the wine industry doing that. You’re seeing a whole range.
Claudia Santiago is going live from her studio giving you a view of her performance, singing different songs, showing you her setup and all that and then also doing talk shows and interview shows. The spectrum of what people are doing now is getting wider and eventually, you’re going to see. It’s probably just an obvious comment. It’s not the greatest prediction ever, right? In 2015 you could have said, “In 2016 you’re going to see different programming” and you did. I’m seeing it’s great to see when I’m doing my update and I have 4 shows about marketing or social media or interviews with authors and whatever, and we love those shows. When you get something different that’s like, “Wow.” Even a show about sports is great. Tonight, like I mentioned, Aaron Kilby’s doing a Twitter chat all about sports and social media it’s like, “Oh, there’s something I haven’t talked about in a while.” I see that, like the whole range of possibilities opening up.
As TV has so many different genres of programming and whatever, you’re going to get all the different kinds of live programming and any industry in any topic. Obviously the most traditional industries aren’t going to be so fast to get in there, but all different kinds of creative industries, I think, are going to find the avenues to go live and share what they’re working on and what they’re doing and what’s going on and connect to potential customers and fans and things like that. Of course, it’s still one of the best things about live video’s access. That behind the scenes moment before somebody goes on stage or in the locker room after the game, or whatever. When you can get a sense of you’re there.
Now I can actually watch a basketball team that I never get to see in person, I can watch them warm up and feel like I’m at the game. I can see who’s hitting their shots in pre game and who’s not. That, you just never saw that until they started Facebook Live-ing their pregame. You never saw that unless you went to the game, had tickets, and got there 45 minutes early. Now I can see them warming up, I see what their drills are. That’s fascinating to a basketball nerd like me. To somebody else, it’s probably not that interesting. Whatever your interest is, whatever you like to see a little more of, a little more behind the scenes that you never saw before on video, that’s really cool and I can’t wait to see what people do next year that’s different and that we haven’t seen before.

Marc Gawith:
I totally agree with that and I think I was actually just at an event in London, a conference. Integrated Live, it’s a digital marketing conference. Most of the exhibitors there were email marketing companies. Still doing traditional paper click, trying to do lead generation stuff. Ultimately, it just goes to show you that people are still investing their money in those methods. I got to do an interview with the people that put on the show and they were asking me for any tips regarding live video. The 2 that I gave was, the 1st one is just click the button. I think that’s something that we hear a lot of when someone is thinking about going live, just try it. You don’t know what you don’t know.
Secondly, I said almost verbatim what you just said is do what you do best. If you do email marketing well and you love to talk about email marketing, then talk about email marketing but just talk about it live. Give someone the reason to tune in and hear some of that stuff. I think it’s going to be interesting to see live video, these live updates and live conversations replace the traditional white papers and blog posts that you see a lot of people do. How easy is it for us to just click our camera, go live, and talk about something in the moment? It’s much more engaging, at least for me. I’m talking about for me personally, so don’t shoot me if you love reading blog posts and stuff like that.

Ross Brand:
I can’t wait until we’re done, I’ve got a stack of white papers I’m going to sit down and spend.

Marc Gawith:
Afternoon reading, right? No one really says that. For me, to tune in and watch something like this or watch, I love golf. Golf is a passion of mine just like you love basketball. I could literally sit down and watch golf instruction, people talk about golf for all day, every day. That is much more appealing to me than reading about someone talking about golf. I would rather watch someone talk about it than read about it. I think for 2017 specifically, one of my predictions would be that we are going to see more brands start using live video as the way for their consumers to tune in and hear about product updates, product launches, any sort of marketing campaigns that they’re running. We’re going to start to see more and more of that because the technology is so accessible.
To go back to what you were saying, it’s so accessible for anyone to use and I really think you’re going to see brands start to look internally for internal champions that are passionate about talking about the company that they work for, and put those people on camera provided they have the want to be on camera. You can’t force someone to do this, but for myself, a year ago, Summit Live when I first went there, I had never done a live broadcast. I had never been live on camera, anything like that. Experienced the event, got to talk to all of these people; Joel and Ryan, a bunch of other people that were super passionate about it. It rubbed off on me and I started doing it, I’m like, “Oh, this is amazing. I could definitely use this for our company.” Started using it. I think you’re going to see more and more of that in 2017 where there are companies that want to get involved and you’ll see individual contributors from that company start to get involved and that will be their initial foray into live video and doing more live video for their specific company.

Ross Brand:
Look how well it’s worked for you. You look at all the people watching and how many of them are using a dot live to direct people to their show. I think if you had sent all of us white papers on why the dot live is going to be the way to go in 2016 or whatever, you would have gotten a couple of opens and maybe one sell but by going on and actually engaging with people and finding out what’s going on in the community and getting to know people and bringing the dot live experience, really to the community through live video, through being a part of the community, being on shows, talking about it. It’s made a huge impact. You could probably do a white paper if anybody wanted to read a white paper on how a business can use live video to create awareness and even drive revenue, and so forth.
One of the things that kills me is there are so many businesses that are trying to monetize off the live streaming community. You never see them show their face, ever. If they do, they don’t do it very often and they resent having to do it. One of them went out of business obviously. You get what I’m saying, right? You got to understand the culture in which you’re working and you’re operating and what better way to do it than to actually be a member of that community and use the same tools and everything else? I love what you said about for products and for golf. Imagine a new golf club comes out. You always see these infomercials and commercials late at night, right? How this new club is going to let you hit the ball like you’ve never hit it before. You’ll be like Tiger Woods in his prime, or whatever.
They show you this, “Oh, it’s got this little thing in here and that makes it do that and if you grip it like this.” Right? Of course, they had to pay 20,000 dollars to shoot that infomercial or they had to buy advertising at 4 in the morning because it was the only time they could afford or whatever. Yes, they’re reaching a wider audience than they’re going to reach doing a Facebook Live probably, but how much of that audience, unless it’s the golf channel and they’re hitting the die hard’s, how much of that audience is really potential customers?
If they came on and they talked to 20 people, 15 people over and over again and showed. They took the club out and showed them using it, showed a pro who was endorsing it, showed how he changed his grip on it or why he uses that club instead of a different club or whatever. That’s going to do far more, take questions right there. I say, “Why are you holding it that way?” Or, “Why did you choose to use that instead of a different club?” I’m not a golf person, so you’d probably ask far better questions than I would. You get the idea, right? That works for any kind of product. I think I asked you how are people using dot live domains or are they using it as a redirect? Are they using it as the host for their site and things like that? That’s what you can do when you’re communicating with people instead of just pushing out things.
Most people aren’t going to sit down and read the white paper that the golf club maker puts out and try to understand the physics of it. They want to see it in action, they want to know it works. They want to emulate what somebody who can use it can do. That’s what you can do with video that you can’t do with white papers and billboards and things like that, to the extent that people, the competition for our attention is so great and video is one way to quickly grab that attention. It’s easier to watch or listen to a show on live stream while you’re working, while you’re doing something else than it is to sit down with a study and fully engage in it.
Even pay attention to a billboard on a highway and then go, “Okay, I’m going to remember that and then I’m going to get home and I’m going to Google their company.” Obviously you get home, you get 10,000 emails you get 35 notifications on Twitter and Facebook and whatever. You never remember to Google that product that you saw. Here’s a way that you could engage and people are on their computer already when they’re watching this stuff. While you’re talking about dot live I got dot live open in another browser and I’m looking at what the different websites people have done and things like that. That’s how, I think, there’s tremendous value.
I think I have a pretty balanced approach to live streaming. I’m not someone that thinks every business or every person ought to do this. You should play to your strengths, you should play to your industry. There are plenty of businesses who this would be like 10 steps down the road for what they should be doing. They need to bring their website up to date, they need to start engaging more on social, perhaps they need to go door to door or put an ad in the newspaper. There’s all sorts of ways that companies can market and individuals can build their brand.
Some people aren’t good at live video, they don’t like it. It’s not their style or it’s just not accepted in their industry yet. I’m not somebody who says, “Every business.” There are plenty of businesses who are missing an opportunity because they’re doing what made them successful and they’ve fallen in love with that and they feel good about that, and they should feel good about that. That’s not necessarily the way that they’re going to succeed in 2017 and certainly, probably not in 2020. If you’re not always innovating, you’re not always trying new things, not always pushing the envelope you can only ride out that cash cow for so long, right?

Marc Gawith:
Absolutely. One thing that I just was just thinking about as you were talking, at Live Fronts, the panel that I was on with Vincenzo and several other people, the call in who was the chief customer officer for I PowWow mentioned something I thought was really great. Maybe I’d heard it before, but this, for some reason, this time it stuck with me was with live video, it’s a new marketing tool and you can afford to take risks with it. I feel like that is something that maybe we’re going to see a little bit more in 2017 is just people taking a little bit more risks with their live video, their marketing approach. Not necessarily doing it in a bad way, but just being able to do it. There’s no cost to do this, other than our time. This platform that we’re using is free. Facebook is free. Most computers have a built in webcam. You can pick up a microphone like I’m using, for I think it was 40 dollars on Amazon.

Ross Brand:
Right.

Marc Gawith:
The cost to do this is relatively low, if not completely free with the exception of time. You have the ability to take a little more risk with doing this and I think that’s what we’re going to start to see in 2017 as well, is just companies specifically larger brands starting to do a little more live video, taking risks, being a little more creative, thinking outside the box. Not necessarily using it as a tool where they’re tracking RLI, anything like that. Essentially doing it to try to gain awareness, reach a brand new audience, and doing it in a creative way. I thought that really stood out. I want to actually bring in one quick comment from the chat that happened quite a while ago. I think Roberto Blake said it pretty well. “Every year is the year of video, but 2017 will see nearly every social platform fully embrace video.”

Ross Brand:
That’s great.

Marc Gawith:
I think that is spot on. I think if you’re a social media platform and you’re not embracing video, odds are you’re going to use the lion share of your customers. I think video is definitely where everyone is headed. It’s easy to shoot and record and share our experiences with people. I think that was very well put and thank you, Roberto, for sharing that prediction, I guess you might say.

Ross Brand:
I think one of the things that you said, it really hits home with me and I felt for a while is, you always want in business right, low risk, high reward. That’s what live video is. If you try it, you do a few and it doesn’t go well, you’re not failing on a big stage yet. In general, okay you’re going to have a small audience in the beginning.

Marc Gawith:
Exactly.

Ross Brand:
I’ve gotten this question probably a hundred times in the past year. “What happens if I do a show and nobody watches?” My first thought is always, of the hundred things I would worry about before going live, nobody watching is the least of it. The first time I did a show I hoped not too many people were watching in case it didn’t go well. Use the opportunity now, before it becomes a 100% business necessity, use the opportunity to get good. To learn the tools, to learn the process. To learn how to broadcast, to learn how to conduct interviews and carry on conversations and engage in chat and what topics work and trial and error. If it’s not for you, this is a much better time to have tried and then found out, “Okay this isn’t what I want to do.” Or, “This is something my business needs to do, but I’m going to pass it onto somebody else.” What have you, but this is a great time to get involved.
It’s low risk, it doesn’t cost much money. It’s more risk to put an ad in the newspaper and budget for that or put up a billboard ad or to think of anything else that you do. A mailing campaign, a traditional mailing campaign with a catalogue or whatever. Even when you talk about time. Blog posts and things like that take more time than getting on for a half an hour and talking with your community and your customers and your friends and your fans and people like that. I think it’s low risk, high reward. The cost of an infomercial is 10,000, 20,000 dollars. The cost of getting on and talking about your product to only people who would really be interested in it. People that aren’t interested aren’t going to sit through something like that. Who watches commercials anyway these days? Everything’s on DVR, anyway.
You’re better off and particularly for small businesses where getting a good client, getting a good customer, can make a big difference in how they do that month. You don’t have to sell more widgets than Walmart, you just have to get the right people involved and have them become customers, clients, supporters, connect you with other people. Like what you’re doing, amplify what you’re doing. You hit a home run with that. It’s low risk, it’s high reward and the downside is it didn’t go that well. Yes, it’s high risk if you put the wrong person on and they just spew 4 letter words about your business or insult you. For the person, the audience that we’re talking to, responsible people who understand how to communicate and things like that, really isn’t that much of a risk.
The worst thing that happens is you do it for a little while, you don’t get much traction. You don’t enjoy it, you don’t see a benefit to it. You think there’s an opportunity cost to spending an hour twice a week or whatever, and you do something else and that’s it. At least you learn about something that you may be able to use in other ways. You may want to give to someone else when your company does need to do a campaign. I’m all for learning about it, and I’m not for worrying about how many views you got and things like that. If you do the right things over time, you’ll build up a following and again, it’s more important to reach the right people than it is how many people you reach.

Marc Gawith:
Quality over quantity, for sure.

Ross Brand:
Absolutely.

Marc Gawith:
I love that. I think that’s a great way to wrap up the time today is basically on that note, to say now is the time to use live video, to try it. It’s still very much in it’s infancy to go back to my conversation with Joel and using the bell curve. We’re still on the upward swing, right? For live video. It’s not at that mass adoption time yet so now is the time to try it out, to get familiar with it, to take a few risks until the time where it becomes the thing you have to do. Then you’re behind the curve, you’re scrambling to play catch up. You’re trying to figure out, “Who’s the best person we should put on camera for this? X, Y, Z.”
You should basically use this time to try it out, take a few risks, learn from some of the people that are doing it really well. That’s why we created Be dot Live is we wanted to highlight the people that are doing it well. Not that we have access to everybody in live video, but we do have access to a lot of the pioneers in this space to use the Joel Comm descriptive word there. I think now is the time to try this out, to get comfortable, get your feet wet if you’d never done it before. There’s so many platforms and tools that allow you to do it in a professional manner that don’t really cost you anything. Try it out, get familiar with it, learn from people that do it well.
Learn from Ross Brand. Check him out, livestreamuniverse.com. Definitely check him out, what he’s doing. There’s so many good people here in the chat today. Chocolate Johnny, John Kapos is doing amazing things with live video and talking about his perfection chocolates business in Australia. Rachel Moore and Let’s live stream. Joel Comm with Joel.live and the live video revolution. Vincenzo Landino, what he and Amy are doing with Aftermark and their shows. There’s so many people to learn from. Now’s the time to really stand up, take notice, watch video. Don’t read about it, watch the video.

Ross Brand:
That’s right.

Marc Gawith:
Learn those tips. Ross, really, really appreciate you taking an hour out of your day to be on, to join us here at Be.Live broadcasting this. Excuse me, we’ll be posting this Be.Live site shortly after this broadcast ends so if you guys are interested in watching the whole thing, if you missed out on some of it, definitely check this out. Ross is a great person to have as a resource for live video. Definitely has a great, great voice for this with his radio past so appreciate you being on and definitely appreciate being able to reach out and pick your brain when needed.

Ross Brand:
Thanks so much for having me Marc, it’s always great chatting with you and hearing your ideas on live video and what .Live is doing. I so appreciate all the support you’ve given me and so many of the hosts by coming on our shows and supporting us on Twitter and on other social media and everything, so I really appreciate what you’re doing and look forward to having you on the show coming up in February.

Marc Gawith:
Yeah, thanks so much for reaching out and scheduling that. Looking forward to being on it. Have to applaud you for having so many scheduled out so far in advance. Back when Blab was running, I guess I got to leave you with this, back when Blab was running we had our show that we tried to do weekly and we had every intention of getting people scheduled out months in advance and I think we were able to do it maybe 2 weeks in advance. We were always trying to get the next person on board, so kudos to you for your scheduling and just being on top of it and being able to line those up.
Once again guys, thank you so much for watching today. If you’ve missed out on any of it, this will be available on Be.Live. Go check out, watch the entire thing. If you want to see more about what Ross does, check him out at livestreamuniverse.com, Rossbrand.live. Definitely check him out, he’s [inaudible 00:57:15] and doing great things [inaudible 00:57:19]. We will be chatting with a few more people I think here before the end of the year, getting more 2016 recap, 2017, look forward. Appreciate you taking the time today and we will chat with you soon. Thanks, Ross.

Ross Brand:
Thanks, Marc.

Comments 70

  1. DotLive

    Sup kids?

    8 December, 2016
  2. DotLive

    This is Joel and I don’t know how to post as me on mobile. 😜

    8 December, 2016
  3. Luria Petrucci

    You can’t change it on mobile if you’re an admin of the page you’re watching, Joel. 🙂 So frustrating! haha

    8 December, 2016
  4. Patrick Kitchell

    Practice makes perfect

    8 December, 2016
  5. Luria Petrucci

    Thanks, Ross! 🙂

    8 December, 2016
  6. Vincenzo M Landino

    Come Together…. right NOW… over me

    8 December, 2016
  7. Vincenzo M Landino

    Aftermarq predicted the winner. Courtesy of Zoomph analytics 🙂

    8 December, 2016
  8. Joel Comm

    So many live sites! I’m confused.

    8 December, 2016
  9. Patrick Kitchell

    It’s a proble

    8 December, 2016
  10. Joel Comm

    We still need a Blab surrogate

    8 December, 2016
  11. Patrick Kitchell

    Problem we have limited time

    8 December, 2016
  12. Joel Comm

    /me waves to Vincenzo M Landino

    8 December, 2016
  13. Patrick Kitchell

    What’s up Vincenzo

    8 December, 2016
  14. Vincenzo M Landino

    hey Joel Comm!

    8 December, 2016
  15. Vincenzo M Landino

    Hey Luria Petrucci!

    8 December, 2016
  16. Tim Gillette

    hey Joel Comm Hey Ross

    8 December, 2016
  17. Luria Petrucci

    Hey right back at ya Vincenzo M Landino! 🙂

    8 December, 2016
  18. Vincenzo M Landino

    Hey there Patricio!

    8 December, 2016
  19. Patrick Kitchell

    Is that a prediction? Trump buys twitter that’s a prediction

    8 December, 2016
  20. Joel Comm

    I stand by that… AND that live video would be the direction they need to go

    8 December, 2016
  21. Tim Gillette

    yep on the twitter, I see it as well

    8 December, 2016
  22. Joel Comm

    My Spectacles are getting prescription lenses at the optometrist now!

    8 December, 2016
  23. Vincenzo M Landino

    Joel, what was your prediction with Twitter? I am talking about it on my show today… curious what your thoughts are

    8 December, 2016
  24. Patrick Kitchell

    It’s not a prediction we all expect twitter to acquired

    8 December, 2016
  25. Tim Gillette

    as an investor watching that company, twitter is not offering anything for its stock holders

    8 December, 2016
  26. Vincenzo M Landino

    I keep having to change where I’m commenting from, or I’ll be saying some strange things from the DotLive account lol

    8 December, 2016
  27. Vincenzo M Landino

    If the price drops low enough, I’m grabbing it. Already putting together my acquisition team

    8 December, 2016
  28. Patrick Kitchell

    The data foundation isn’t has good as LinkedIn

    8 December, 2016
  29. Joel Comm

    It WILL drop. They aren’t making money. Dorsey’s leadership is horrible.

    8 December, 2016
  30. Patrick Kitchell

    I have one influencer marketing collapses that is my prediction

    8 December, 2016
  31. Vincenzo M Landino

    No chance influencer marketing collapses, Patrick

    8 December, 2016
  32. John Kapos

    Gday Ross

    8 December, 2016
  33. Patrick Kitchell

    I bet it will Vincenzo it’s a house of cards

    8 December, 2016
  34. Zef Zan

    Hey CHOC JOHNNY!

    8 December, 2016
  35. Patrick Kitchell

    The uberism of broadcasting

    8 December, 2016
  36. Joel Comm

    Real influencers have always influenced. It’s not going away. But those who aren’t effective aren’t really influencers.

    8 December, 2016
  37. Mitch Jackson

    What is going on my livestreaming and domain producing peeps!!!

    8 December, 2016
  38. Patrick Kitchell

    You know meerkat had a great feature where you could invite those watching in to talk

    8 December, 2016
  39. John Kapos

    Your mobile phone will be your soap box.

    8 December, 2016
  40. Roberto Blake

    Every year is the year of video but 2017 will see nearly every social platform fully embrace video

    8 December, 2016
  41. Kevin Black

    There is more evidence of retail sales being conducted as per projections for eCommerce 2017.

    8 December, 2016
  42. Joel Comm

    Ross Brand IS a brand!

    8 December, 2016
  43. Mitch Jackson

    My chocolate covered soap box John Kapos!

    8 December, 2016
  44. Joel Comm

    Twitter Live

    8 December, 2016
  45. Patrick Kitchell

    What’s YouTube algorithms freak out when pewdie pie deletes his account with 50 million subscribers

    8 December, 2016
  46. Patrick Kitchell

    *watch

    8 December, 2016
  47. Mike Baltus

    Bets tshirt I ever saw… “I AM THE BRAND” he is an active entrepreneur doing great work in the Denver area

    8 December, 2016
  48. Patrick Kitchell

    YouTubea

    8 December, 2016
  49. Roberto Blake

    Why Facebook for a show specifically vs YouTube Live?

    8 December, 2016
  50. Mike Baltus

    FB will lead the pack as far as platforms, due to real-time eCommerce opportunities, don’t have to get to another sight to buy.

    8 December, 2016
  51. Joel Comm

    Both, please!

    8 December, 2016
  52. Mitch Jackson

    Roberto Blake going to need to change the time next week. I’ll reach out with some options.

    8 December, 2016
  53. Patrick Kitchell

    Facebook is an echo chamber

    8 December, 2016
  54. Patrick Kitchell

    Twitch is a power house

    8 December, 2016
  55. Mike Baltus

    Love how the NFL had to correct course as related to NFL social policies…

    8 December, 2016
  56. Rachel Moore

    “Stream what you know.”

    8 December, 2016
  57. Rachel Moore

    Particularly as the 3rd party tools help them feature their content.

    8 December, 2016
  58. Rachel Moore

    Saw an article today that livestreaming can be used as an immediate “help desk.”

    8 December, 2016
  59. Rachel Moore

    ‘Sup, Marc & Ross!

    8 December, 2016
  60. Roberto Blake

    There is a lot of romanticism around past success

    8 December, 2016
  61. Roberto Blake

    Always be creating… new opportunity to win on your strengths

    8 December, 2016
  62. Rachel Moore

    They need to show the real people, not over-produced. That IS risky, but so rewarding.

    8 December, 2016
  63. Roberto Blake

    I’d love to help LiveFronts with YouTube and YouTube Live almost nobody is covering YouTube Live at the moment.

    8 December, 2016
  64. John Kapos

    My Instagram posts on Perfection chocolates are now all video. The numbers and ROI is amazing.

    8 December, 2016
  65. John Kapos

    Today we are doing a Facebook live to show my clients Christmas hampers.

    8 December, 2016
  66. Rachel Moore

    “Now is the time to use live video.” :micdrop:

    8 December, 2016
  67. Kevin Black

    Ross is such a professional and is always bringing us the greatest voices in the space!

    8 December, 2016
  68. Rachel Moore

    There are so many more talented broadcasters waiting to get started. Just do it!

    8 December, 2016
  69. Rachel Moore

    LOL oh, Blab.

    8 December, 2016
  70. Steven Healey

    Great show

    8 December, 2016